Thin Yarns
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Cosmos Camisole
By Suzanne Locascio

Media:

Camisole top: sewn in cotton muslin, eco-dyed with fresh cosmos flowers. Pattern is named “Ogden Cami” by True Bias. Sewn by the artist.  July 2021.

Not for Sale

Blue V-Tee
By Suzanne Locascio

Media:

Shirt: knit in sock weight superwash wool yarn. All yarn dyed by Wobble Gobble Yarn. Pattern is named “V-Back Tee” by Knitosophy. Knit by the artist. October 2020.

Not for Sale

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When it Began Sweater
By Suzanne Locascio

Media:

This sweater was cast on during the artist’s spring break in Savannah, GA, when it was announced that the COVID-19 virus had progressed to a pandemic. Sweater: knit in sock weight wool blend yarns: turquoise, lime green, and heathered gray by Ballyhara Farms; purple yarn from Manos del Uruguay. Pattern is named “Sunset Highway” by Caitlin Hunter. Knit by the artist. June 2020. 

Not for Sale

Walnut Dyed Silk Scarf and Eco-Dyed Silk Scarf
By Suzanne Locascio

Media:

Silk scarf dyed in walnut husks.

October 2020

 

and 

Silk scarf dyed in goldenrod in the fall, then overdyed with fresh marigolds and cosmos in the summer. October 2020 and July 2021

Not for Sale

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About the Artist

Suzanne Locascio (she/her) is a local artist and longtime resident of the New River Valley. Her recent concentration and obsession with fiber arts and natural dyeing developed during the time of the COVID-19 global pandemic. After teaching online art and graphic design classes at Radford University in the Spring of 2020 and 2021, she would spend the rest of her day knitting and sewing new and challenging garments or walking the neighborhood with her dog Gus. This respite from indoor quarantine allowed her to focus on tiny discoveries: the neighborhood flora that was most often ignored could actually be used as part of the process of fiber arts - specifically natural dyeing. The first tiny discovery was black walnuts, usually a pesky tripping hazard, that had fallen to the ground. The rich brown hues that could so easily be extracted from the husk had vaulted Suzanne’s interest into searching for other plants and flowers that could also have color extracted. One of her other passions, gardening, would support extending the color pallet in summer growing season to provide an array of golden yellows and neon oranges from chamomile, cosmos, and marigold flowers. She will continue her natural dyeing journey this summer with homegrown Japanese Indigo, Persicaria tinctoria, and will begin too many knitting projects simultaneously.